Posts with tag mac

Phones, Macs, and Watches - oh my

What to realistically expect at WWDC 2015 tomorrow




WWDC-2015-invitationI’m a procrastinator. I have a tendency to wait until the very last minute to do anything, including publish these sort of What to Realistically Expect stories. Finally, my infliction has paid off – if I had written this even just last week, I would have jotted down new Apple TV hardware and software as a stone cold sure thing. Yet according to the ever reliable Brian X. Chen, Apple threw away plans to announce new Apple TV hardware and a cohesive developer ecosystem at WWDC at the very last minute because “the product was not ready for prime time”.

Given that I’m an avid user of the current iteration of Apple TV (I stream all my nightly television from there), I’m bummed to see this cut. I was hoping this would be when the Apple TV truly grew up and became a major player in the Apple line-up. Alas.

Time is short and things run behind schedule, and so it goes. There’s always September.

And in the spirit of that, we’re still on the verge of an entire week’s worth of new Apple products, platforms, and goodies. The Apple TV may not be there, but there’s still plenty left to cover. Here’s what you can realistically expect at WWDC 2015, starting tomorrow, June 8th.


Graphics card failures, angry customers, and a class action lawsuit

I’m part of the #mbp2011 club – MacBook Pro models sold in 2011 are dropping like flies




IMG_2706

If you’re the proud owner of a 15″ or 17″ MacBook Pro, take note; if you purchased your beloved MacBook Pro in 2011, keep an extra careful eye on your precious cargo. We’re over 750 pages into a post on Apple’s own Community Support forums, hundreds of Twitter posts later, and countless cases of defective MacBook Pro logic boards later, it’s become apparent to – well – just about everybody paying attention that there’s something wrong with these machines. Thousands have revealed that their 15″ or 17″ MacBook Pro, purchased in 2011, have suddenly just… stopped working; including my own. The root of the problem apparently lies within these notebook’s graphics cards, which are integrated into the logic board.

The signs vary slightly, but just about every time inevitably lead to a single solution – replacement of the entire logic board. I was working on my three year old notebook like normal yesterday when all of a sudden the screen went white. Thinking it was nothing but a system crash, I held down the power button and turned the machine back on – only to be greeted by the familiar Apple logo distorted, with the entire screen covered in a putrid shade of green. What’s worse, upon booting the operating system my entire notebook crashes nearly every single time; for an entire day now, my only solution has been to run the machine in single user mode… which is hardly a solution at all.

Browsing through Apple’s own support community reveals that others have similar issues ranging in severity. Some notebooks appear to work fine for a couple of minutes, booting up and allowing the user to work without a problem, until the graphics of the machine suddenly gets distorted leading to a lockup. Another common one sees the notebook working when the operating system is forced to only recognize these notebook’s integrated Intel graphics using a tool such as gfxCardStatus, however this solution didn’t work for me. One unlucky MacBook Pro owner has seen four of these 2011 MacBook Pros see logic board failures, suggesting that issues with these models may be more widespread than first believed.IMG_2976

The worst part about all of this isn’t even that Apple sold defective machines to customers for almost an entire year – though, that is pretty bad in and of itself – it’s that the company is now refusing to even acknowledge that there’s an issue. Despite a ton of pressure from customers, the support forum topic, and even an entire event dedicated to raising awareness on social networks by customers bitten by this bad Apple, Apple has remained silent on the issue – refusing to acknowledge a widespread issue nor issuing any sort of recall. Which means that, if you’re like me and the warranty is up on your MacBook Pro, you’re looking at a logic board replacement of around $750 just to get a laptop that, for all you know, could fail in a matter of weeks, months or just a few short years all over again.

In order to force Apple’s hand on the issue, a class action lawsuit has been launched against the company on behalf of owners of the 2011 MacBook Pro models effected, as well as owners of some other Mac models that might suffer similar issues. The lawsuit claims that Apple “had knowledge of the defect, yet willfully and intentionally decided to hide the defect, resulting in continuing damage to the Class.”

We’ve reached out to Apple for comment and will update this post with any response or information we might receive.


Except for that non-Retina one. That's still old and busted.

Apple updates their MacBook Pro lineup with better prices, faster product




macbookprofamily

Just as the interwebs has predicted, Apple has today released a slightly refreshed updated MacBook Pro lineup, bringing some slightly better prices, faster processors, and more memory for nearly all of Apple’s MacBook Pro configurations.

The MacBook Pro with Retina Display has seen updates in both their 13″ size as well as their 15″ size; for $1299, customers can now get their hands on a notebook with a 2.6 GHz dual-core i5 processor, 8GB of RAM, and a 128GB solid state drive. Customers can upgrade to 256GB of solid state storage for an additional $200, or for $1799 they’ll upgrade to a 2.8 GHz dual-core i5 processor as well as 512GB of solid state storage.

The 15″ models get similar upgrades, with the base $1999 model seeing a bump to a 2.2 GHz quad-core i7 processor as well as 16GB of memory, twice as much as before at this same price point. The high end 15″ model gets a price drop to $2499, and now carries a 2.5 GHz quad-core i7 processor, the same 16GB of memory, and 512GB of solid state storage. These are all the same Haswell based processors as before, but with slightly faster clock speeds – each option bringing with it about 200 MHz of extra speed.

The lone remaining non-Retina option, the base model 13″ MacBook Pro, remains – unfortunately – completely unchanged. We’ve got the same old, two year-old processor – the same mechanical hard drive based storage options – and the same amount of memory. What is changed their is a new price. Apple has decided that the 13″ MacBook Pro, which the customer sees as a popular machine for “Windows switchers”, gets a price drop to $1,099. Still fairly pricy for what you’re getting, but let’s be honest here – if you’re interested in a Mac, you should really only be looking at the MacBook Air lineup or the MacBook Pro with Retina Display lineup.

Source: Apple


A minor refresh

Apple to launch updated iMac models next Tuesday




2012_imacs_left_right-500x451The current iMac models have been around for quite some time now, so of course, that means it’s time to get rid of them. According to the same folks who originally (correctly) reported that the MacBook Airs would be getting some updated models last year, Apple is preparing to launch updated iMac models this upcoming week – likely Tuesday, given Apple’s predictability.

While we don’t have specifics as to what the new iMacs will contain, we’d be willing to bet all things shiny and glittery in our possession that the new iMacs will be just like the new MacBook Airs before them – minor spec boosts with the same overall design. The current iMac’s design was only introduced in October 2012, after all, and it remains just as stunning – and impressively slim – as it did back then.

So that said, get ready for more of the same with a slightly faster processor, more memory, perhaps some boosted storage options, and maybe – just maybe – even a price drop, if Apple’s to follow the example set by their recent MacBook Air launch. That said, that decidedly non Retina display is getting pretty long in the tooth, don’t you think?

Via: MacRumors
Source: MacGeneration


Ohh, translucency

Apple posts OS X Yosemite design video




osxyosemite-video

Apple has today posted a video showcasing the new user interface design found in their upcoming update to their desktop operating system found on their Mac lineup of computers, OS X Yosemite. OS X Yosemite represents the most major clear visual design overhaul for Mac in quite some time – arguably since Apple first unveiled the Aqua interface found in OS X 10.0 – OS X 10.4, originally introduced in 2001.

It’s also worth pointing out that we’ve got our very own (very) early first look at the first OS X Yosemite Developer Preview, which was released for developers at Apple’s WWDC conference last week.

Sound good? Check out Apple’s new OS X Yosemite design video after the break.


These are uncharted waters

A (very) early first look at the OS X 10.10 Yosemite Developer Preview




overview_hero_x

Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference was yesterday, and at the introductory keynote event company CEO Tim Cook alongside a couple of other Apple executives (including a cameo by Dr. Dre) introduced a whole slew of new software goodies ranging from revolutionary to evolutionary. Arguably the real star of the show, however, was the company’s eleventh major OS X release, OS X 10.10 Yosemite (10.0 being the first).

While Apple has been focusing on the little things with no major overhauls on the Mac side of things for quite some time now, OS X Yosemite marks a drastic change for the software that all of the Mac line of computers will be running come this Autumn. Taking more than a few cues from the software’s younger, more portable sibling – iOS 7 – Yosemite definitely falls under the “revolution” side of the aisle while this year’s iOS 8 update fell on the “evolutionary” side.

But is it any good? We’ve got our hands on the OS X 10.10 Yosemite Developer Preview that the company gave to all paying OS X Developers yesterday. Let’s take a look after the break.


The hype has begun

Apple transforms Moscone West for WWDC14




applelogoDon’t look now, but Apple has begun transforming the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco into the showcase for their latest and greatest products and developers alike. WWDC 2014, or WWDC14 as Apple has taken to calling it this year, doesn’t begin until this upcoming Monday, but let’s take a look at some of Apple’s decorations, some of which hint to some pretty big changes. Photos sourced from numerous sources.

First, MacStories editor Federico Viticci has grabbed some photos of the outside of the center, including work being done on the giant Apple logo that will cover glass panels on the outside of the building. The Metreon building across the street is also home to some WWDC14 branded promotional images, as you can after the beak below.


Here's what's (probably) coming, not what's not

What to realistically expect at Apple’s WWDC 2014 event next Monday




wwdc-2014-logo

Another day, another dollar. Another June, another WWDC conference. Last year Apple bestowed upon us the new, Jony Ive-ified iOS version, iOS 7 – with its colorful hues, stark white backgrounds, and gradients – oh, the gradients – and it was the talk of the metaphorical town. But iOS 7 is so last year – let’s fine out what Apple has in store for us this year. This is – once again – what to realistically expect at Apple’s WWDC 2014 event, taking place next Monday, June 2nd… and not what’s not.

What to realistically expect…” is a series of posts which we use to temper expectations concerning upcoming Apple events. We’ve got a pretty good track record here, with only one small miss with our iPhone 5s/5c event predictions.


Promises "exciting announcements"

Apple to stream WWDC 2014 Keynote




june_2014_posterframe

While it’s fairly easy to predict when Apple will be giving certain keynotes and hosting special events, it’s harder to know how to or where to watch them. While the company doesn’t usually stream their special events, its making an exception next week as they’ve just announced that they’ll be live streaming their main keynote, hosted by Apple CEO Tim Cook, next Monday.

The special event starts at 10am PDT, 1pm EDT next Monday, and if you’re interested in seeing for yourself what Apple has in store you can bookmark this page to get you to the action when the event kicks off. We’re also planning on extensively covering the event, bringing to you a fresh take of whatever Apple introduces next week – so stay tuned for that.

Via: Daring Fireball
Source: Apple


He designed the iPhone, have you heard of it?

Apple Human Interface Vice President Greg Christie saying goodbye after 20 years




jonyive

Apple has officially announced following a scoop by 9to5Mac‘s Mark Gurman this afternoon that Greg Christie, Apple’s Human Interface Vice President and also known as the man who designed most of the concepts behind the user experience that would become a staple of the iPhone, and thus the modern smartphone as a whole, would be leaving the company after 20 years.

Greg Christie was essentially the head of design for all of Apple’s major platforms, including OS X and iOS, for years now. His influence was limitless – without Christie, both the iPhone and Mac OS X would look very, very different today. Christie will be sticking around Apple for a greater part of the rest of 2014, and following his departure Apple’s Senior Vice President of Design Jony Ive, who famously took the lead in redesigning iOS 7 last year, will be taking on Christie’s responsibilities.

While Mark Gurman also reported that Greg Christie’s decision to leave was influenced by growing discord between him and Jony Ive, DaringFireball‘s John Gruber says that this was not at all the case, saying, “Christie and Ive may not see eye to eye on UI design style, but his departure isn’t nearly as contentious as Mark Gurman’s report at 9to5Mac implies. The basic gist I’ve heard is that Christie is a guy who’s been in a high-pressure, high-profile job for 18 years, most of it reporting to Steve Jobs. He’s made a lot of money and is ready to enjoy it.”

You know what Mr. Christie? I don’t blame you – I’d be ready to smell the roses after such a long time in Cupertino as well. Let’s hope Ive is up for the challenge.

Source: Recode / 9to5Mac / DaringFireball


Your supercomputer is on its way

Mac Pro Build-To-Order orders start shipping




2013_mac_pro

Let’s be honest here – if you’re in the market for a new, beautiful, but undoubtably expensive Mac Pro, you were probably tempted by the even more expensive build to order options. Don’t worry, don’t worry – there’s no shame in admitting it – I browsed through that order page as well. If so, you’ll be happy to know that your build-to-order Mac Pro has likely either already shipped or about to ship.

Mass reports have indicated that Apple has begun shipping the first batch of build-to-order units, some of which are slated to arrive as soon as today. Those who were first out the gate in ordering a standard model have likely been playing with theirs for a couple of days now, but hey, a little patience may have been worth it for that supercomputer you’re about to have arrive on your doorstep. Just make sure that you’re actually there when UPS arrives at your doorstep, okay?

Source: MacRumors


Not too shabby

In 24 hours, OS X Mavericks adoption is at nearly 10%




OSXMavericksAdoption24hoursFree, as it turns out, is a big motivator. According to GoSquared’s OS X Mavericks live usage tracking tool, OS X Mavericks adoption is closing in at 10 percent (9.3 percent, to be exact) adoption in just barely over 24 hours. That’s a huge number – at this point following the release of OS X Mountain Lion, Mountain Lion had only hit just under 2 percent adoption. That’s over 4 times as many people using Apple’s latest and greatest in the same span of time.

Of course, there are some pretty big differences between the release and deploying of OS X Mavericks and OS X Mountain Lion – namely, Mountain Lion cost $29 while Mavericks is available to all eligible OS X users, free of charge. That’s every Mac user in the world with a Mac manufactured in around 2009 or later, including Apple’s line of iMac, Mac mini, and Mac Pro desktops as well as MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air users.

Source: GoSquared